Father and Daughter

Father and Daughter
Father and Daughter

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“FATHER AND DAUGHTER” is an original color pencil drawing by Mark Cooper, resident of the Centennial State, Colorado. Mark was born with Alport Syndrome, a disease that affects the kidneys. The disease also affects his hearing and eyesight. This greeting card was reproduced from an original artwork by Mark Cooper for THASC Sales Co., which has employed a unique group of handicapped artists who create art to help rehabilitate themselves. They gain self-respect and pride through their artwork.
“FATHER AND DAUGHTER” is an original color pencil drawing by Mark Cooper, resident of the Centennial State, Colorado. Mark was born with Alport Syndrome, a disease that affects the kidneys. The disease also affects his hearing and eyesight. This greeting card was reproduced from an original artwork by Mark Cooper for THASC Sales Co., which has employed a unique group of handicapped artists who create art to help rehabilitate themselves. They gain self-respect and pride through their artwork.

Fittingly on Labor Day I am thinking of a tireless man that spent every waking hour supporting his family by working multiple jobs just so he could have Sundays to spend the whole day with us. He loved playing golf, but would play at 6:30 Sunday mornings so he would be back home in time for church and dinner with the family. I treasured my time with my Dad and especially the time we had alone. He was an intelligent and generous man and taught me many things. He passed his beautiful handwriting on to me and educated me. Growing up my dad always took the responsibility of teaching us about the “birds and the bees”. When it was my turn, he took me into the living room and opened up the biology book.

Dad and me napping
Dad and me napping

I learned how to cook from him and he gave me my love and passion for the beach. As a child (and still today) I had terrible allergies in summer so my Dad brought the family to a summer cottage on the shore where I could collect shells, swim with my brother and sister, dig for quahogs and investigate the urchins in the sea. In the late afternoons we would nap in the hammock together with my Howdy Doody doll.

THASC artist Mark Cooper’s drawing brings me back to the water and the summer walks with my father at my uncle’s camp. Frequently we would see dragonflies which are often found near the water. Mark accentuates the dragonfly in his drawing, reminding us that they are symbols of happiness, courage, and strength, all qualities which my Dad possessed.

In Japan as a seasonal symbol, the dragonfly is associated with autumn and often appears in art. My nephew has a Tiffany dragonfly lamp and, using beach glass, my niece designed a window in her home in the shape of a dragonfly. I was also sent lovely flowers with a beautiful silk dragonfly in the middle of them.

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Tiffany dragonfly lamp and artificial silk dragonfly

My father would remember my favorite pastry was a jelly donut and my favorite ice-cream flavor was chocolate and made sure on Sundays in Lent, when we were allowed to break our fast, he would bring me one. He gave me dollars for “A’s” on my report card, but was terrified when I told him I was going to study in Florence, Italy, for my Master’s. He wrote me endlessly. I’ll never forget how proud he was standing by my side at graduation.

Dad with his older daughter Sara
Dad with his older daughter Sara

Mark Cooper’s drawing of “Father and Daughter” is presented in the “circle of life” to me, beginning my formative years with a special man, on a walk in nature. Though I lost him far too young, that circle never ends. The dragonfly remains.

See you all on Thursday when we remember our freedom once again!

-Maria

THASC is a unique small American business producing cards and other promotional products.
www.thasc.com

4 thoughts on “Father and Daughter

  1. Dana September 8, 2015 / 11:43 am

    Maria,

    You looked like you had some great times with your father. I am.sorry he died ao young.
    Napping with your father,that looked relaxful. I wish l could jave napped or did more things with my dad. Hes atill alive, but l am all grown up now,and lt’s to late to do kid things. But they say It’s never to late,to act like like a kid. Enjoy those memories!!!!

    Like

    • Maria Libera September 8, 2015 / 1:23 pm

      Dear Dana, my dad did many things for me not just as a child but well into my early adult life as well. I was so fortunate to have a father who cared so muchl

      Like

  2. Rosaleen Melone October 5, 2015 / 3:12 am

    Dear Maria,
    What a tranquil scene Mark Cooper depicts in his color pencil drawing, “Father and Daughter.” It has a very inviting vibe to it making me want to jump in and be there taking a walk, too, yet also not wanting to disturb this special and quiet time being shared by a father and his daughter. And what a loving tribute to your father, Maria. Yes, he was taken from us far too soon. I am glad you have so many nice memories of him. I can still see him in my mind’s eye walking across the street with a plateful of dough boys for us on a Sunday morning, Sweet …
    Have a peaceful heart, my friend.
    R xo

    Like

  3. Anne goldstein October 9, 2015 / 9:37 pm

    Dearest Maria:
    Not only am I impressed by your talented artists but more importantly with their fortitude . Such very special people that are great role models. I also enjoy reading your articles. Some make me melancholy in a good way. Yes, Fall is upon us with brilliant, warm colors as well as the circle of life. Gardens are put to sleep, squirrels and chipmunks fill their pouches preparing for winter, trees and other plantings drop their seeds to hopefully reproduce. The deer and coyote come closer to civilization as it gets colder and their food source wanes. Howls in the night from the packs communicating their location and hooting of owls ever so softly in the still night. All telling me, it’s time to put on my flannel pajamas!😀

    Like

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